Did Ed Sheeran rip “Shape of You” chorus from Sami Switch?

While UK courts are evaluating whether Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You” (2017) is a blatant lift of Sam Chokri’s (aka Sami Switch) song “Oh Why” (2015)  Sheeran’s royalties for his hit are suspended. This isn’t the first time Sheeran has appeared on this site. Check out the bottom of this post for more.

“Ed Sheeran has been blocked from receiving any royalties for his monster hit ‘Shape of You’, after he was accused of “appropriating” other people’s music.

The global star is facing fresh allegations which accuse him of partaking “consciously or subconsciously in the habit of appropriating the compositional skill and labour of other songwriters”.

While Sheeran has denied the claims, High Court documents cite musician Sam Chokri – who is battling Sheeran over claims that the singer ripped off the chorus for ‘Shape Of You’ from Chokri’s 2015 song ‘Oh Why’.

Chokri claims that he sent the track to Sheeran’s close inner circle in a bid to work with the star, but later heard the chorus on ‘Shape Of You’ – which became the biggest selling single of 2017 in the UK and generated an estimated £20 million in revenues.

Read more atNME

Have a listen to both choruses right here:

Ed Sheeran - "Shape of You" (2017)
Sami Switch - "Oh Why" (2015)

More Ed Sheeran Soundalikes here:

Ed Sheeran, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill sued for “The Rest of Our Life” (Settled)

Ed Sheeran being sued for Thinking Out Loud

Ed Sheeran Being Sued $20M for Photograph

Ed Sheeran vs. Yacht vs. The Rolling Stones

Full songs on YouTube here:

 

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One Reply to “Did Ed Sheeran rip “Shape of You” chorus from Sami Switch?”

  1. TheHappySpaceman

    …This? This is the most base similarity–IT’S LITERALLY JUST SINGING “OH-WHY-OH”! HOW IS THAT CLOSE ENOUGH FOR A LAWSUIT?!

    Is this just what failing pop singers do nowadays to get publicity? Just sue people more famous than them for similarities that are barely even there? It seems to be happening more and more frequently, and given the frequency of the courts agreeing with the accusers, it could mark a negative precedent for the music industry and the future of songwriting.

    Reply

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