Archive for the ‘Feature’ Category

Dr. Luke vs. The World

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Dr. Luke vs. The World

Lukasz Gottwald (aka Dr. Luke) is making headlines this week as Ke$ha checks in to rehab for an eating disorder. Word is he has a history of verbal abuse. I’ll leave that news to the experts at People Magazine. A Ke$ha fan has even created an online petition called “Let Ke$ha have creative freedom“.

So let me take this opportunity to present a compilation of Dr. Luke produced tracks over the years and the songs that they sound like. Enjoy!

 


Dr. Luke (Lukasz Gottwald) has been racking up the hits in the last few years for artists like Katy Perry, Britney Spears and Ke$ha. He’s also been at the center of numerous copyright infringement cases. And of course made many appearances on ThatSongSoundsLike. I thought it might be interesting if I compiled a bunch together in one post. Enjoy!

One Direction vs. Queen

One Direction - "Rock Me - produced by Dr. Luke" (2012)

Queen - "We Will Rock You" (1977)

Avril Lavigne vs. Peaches

Original Post

Avril Lavigne - "I Don't Have to Try - produced by Dr. Luke" (2007)

Peaches - "I'm the Kinda" (2003)

Daughtry vs. The Asphalt

Original Post

Daughtry - "Feels Like Tonight - produced by Dr. Luke" (2006)

The Asphalt - "Tonight" (2005)

Chrissy vs. Ke$ha

Original Post Here

Chrissy - "My Slushy" (2006)

Ke$ha - "Tik Tok - produced by Dr. Luke" (2009)

Kesha vs. Flo Rida vs. Taio Cruz

Original Post Here

Taio Cruz - "Dynamite - produced by Dr. Luke" (2010)

Flo Rida - "Good Feeling - produced by Dr. Luke" (2011)

Ke$ha - "Die Young - produced by Dr. Luke" (2012)

Pink vs. The Veronicas

The Veronicas - "4ever - produced by Dr. Luke" (2005)

Pink - "U + Ur Hand - produced by Dr. Luke" (2006)

Avril Lavigne vs. The Rubinoos

Orginal Post Here

Avril Lavigne - "Girlfriend - produced by Dr. Luke" (2007)

The Rubinoos - "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend" (1979)

Britney Spears vs. Jermaine Jacksin

Original Post Here

Britney Spears - "Hold it Against Me - produced by Dr. Luke" (2011)

Jermaine Jackson - "When the Rain Begins to Fall" (1984)

Katy Perry vs. t.A.T.u.

Orginal Post Here

Katy Perry - "E.T. - produced by Dr. Luke" (2011)

t.A.T.u. - "All The Things She Said" (2000)

Justice vs. Ke$ha vs. Miley Cyrus

Original Post Here

Justice - "The Party" (2009)

Ke$ha - "Tik Tok - produced by Dr. Luke" (2009)

Miley Cyrus - "Permanent December" (2010)

Yeah Yeah Yeahs vs. Kelly Clarkson

Yeah Yeah Yeahs - "Maps" (2/2004)

Kelly Clarkson - produced by Dr. Luke - "Since U Been Gone" (12/2004)

Have a nice day!

10 One Direction Songs that Sound Like Other Songs

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

10 One Direction Songs that Sound Like Other Songs

Research shows that putting a number in the title will generate 50% more clicks.* Research also shows that One Direction songs sound a lot like other songs.**

* I made that up, but it’s probably something like that
** That research is what you can listen to below


VS The Clash

The Clash vs. One Direction on ThatSongSoundsLike.com
Submitted by Alex via the facebook page

If you look really closely at the cover of The Clash‘s Combat Rock (1982) you will see the boy band One Direction in the background. This explains it all.

One Direction - "Live While We're Young" (2012)

The Clash - "Should I Stay or Should I Go" (1982)


VS Big Time Rush


One Direction - "Heart Attack" (2012)

Big Time Rush - "Song For You" (2013)


VS Avril Lavigne


One Direction - "Last First Kiss" (2012)

Avril Lavigne - "Wish You Were Here" (2011)


VS Chris Medina


One Direction - "They Don't Know About Us (Intro)" (2012)

One Direction - "They Don't Know About Us (Chorus)" (2012)

Chris Medina - "What Are Words" (2011)

After listening to these Taylor Dayne‘s 1987 hit “Tell It to My Heart” also comes to mind:

Taylor Dayne - "Tell It to My Heart" (1987)

VS Grease Soundtrack


submitted by Sam and Ilan

One Direction - "What Makes You Beautiful" (2011)

Grease - "Summer Nights" (1978)


VS The Who


One Direction - "Best Song Ever " (2013)

The Who - "Baba O'Riley (aka Teenage Wasteland) " (1971)


VS Queen


submitted by James C.

One Direction - "Rock Me" (2012)

Queen - "We Will Rock You" (1977)

A homage? Perhaps. But take note, this track is produced by our old friend Dr. Luke


VS Red (also stylized R3D)


submitted by “Secret Secret”

One Direction - "More Than This" (2012)

Red - "Never Be the Same" (2008)


VS Taio Cruz


submitted by La La La

One Direction - "Stole My Heart (chorus)" (2011)

Taio Cruz - "Dynamite (chorus)" (2010)

Might as well compare the intros too…

One Direction - "Stole My Heart (into)" (2011)

Taio Cruz - "Dynamite (intro)" (2010)

And don’t forget these from this post.

Chris Brown - "Yeah 3X" (2010)

Calvin Harris - "I'm Not Alone" (2009)

DJ Sammy - "Heaven" (2002)


VS Kelly Clarkson


submitted by La La La

The least you can do is change the name of the song.

One Direction - "Strong" (2013)

Kelly Clarkson - "Stronger" (2012)


Some more if you want to keep digging:
“Crazy Cakes” submitted:
One Direction “Save You Tonight” vs. Erasure “Always”
[http://www.thatsongsoundslike.com/2011/07/25/katy-perry-vs-erasure/]

La La La also submitted:
One Direction “I Want” vs. Feist “My Moon, My Man”
One Direction – “Na Na Na” vs. High School Musical 2: ‘All for One’
One Direction – “Gotta Be You” vs. The Verve “BitterSweet Symphony”

 

 

Recurring Riffs Mark II: Shangri-La and the Great Big Kiss

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

One of the great girl groups of the 1960s, the Shangri-Las emerged during the twilight years of the Brill Building’s reign over the world’s teen audiences. Under the tutelage of producer/songwriter Shadow Morton, they not only unleashed arguably THE great teen tragedy song of the era in “Leader of the Pack”, but also projected a black-clad-in-leather, bad-girl persona that was something of an anomaly on the charts in 1964. Though leader Mary Weiss was only 16 when they took off, the group sang of teenage lust through the lens of a wild storm of rebellion, somewhat removed from the innocent lovelorn daydreaming that was most girl groups’ stock-in-trade. In so doing, they must have exacted a huge influence on many following acts which took a cue from their sweet-voiced glorification of edgy street culture, perhaps most significantly their hit “Give Him A Great Big Kiss”. It’s here that we get the ultimate description of the attractive “bad boy”, the natural elaboration on the Crystal’s “He’s a Rebel” (1962), and the main subject of this post.

The song kicks off with this famous rallying cry:

The Shangri-Las - "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" (1964)

The “L-U-V” bit was resurrected by the New York Dolls for a song off their 1973 debut record:

New York Dolls - "Looking For A Kiss" (1973)

And again by the Nation of Ulysses from their 13 Point Plan To Destroy America:

The Nation of Ulysses - "Today I Met The Girl I'm Going To Marry" (1991)

Three very different songs to be sure — a testament not only to the wide-ranging appeal of the phrase, but also its disarming quality as an assured pronouncement of love in the midst of anarchy. This is particularly true of the Nation of Ulysses track, whose title alone exudes an outward sweetness absent from much of their post-hardcore record, but it also applies to David Johansen of the Dolls assuring his girl that “I didn’t come here for no fix — I came looking for a kiss.”

One of the coolest proclamations on the Shangri-Las’ “Give Him A Great Big Kiss” comes in a spoken dialogue between the girls:

The Shangri-Las - "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" (1964)

This whole notion of “Good Bad — Not Evil” so perfectly encapsulates what they and their ilk are on about that it’s no wonder Black Lips used it as an album title in 2007:

Indeed, the spoken parts of “Great Big Kiss” are quite possibly its best moments, and here’s another:

The Shangri-Las - "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" (1964)

Sonic Youth referred to the “very, very close” line on this number featuring Kim Deal from 1995:

Sonic Youth - "Little Trouble Girl" (1995)

Of course, it’s hard not to think of the Shangri-Las’s “Mwah!” chorus on every tune that mentions a “Great Big Kiss”, whether related or not, like the Slits’ “Love und Romance”:

The Shangri-Las - "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" (1964)
The Slits - "Love und Romance" (1979)

From the proto-punk New York Dolls’ obvious admiration on through the other artists mentioned above, it’s easy to see why the Shangri-Las are said to have had an impact on the punk ethos at large. In the spirit of that, to close things out, let’s hear a gender-reversed cover by the legendary Johnny Thunders:

Johnny Thunders - "Great Big Kiss" (1978)

The Beatles vs. Bob Dylan

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

Bob Dylan vs. The Beatles

Of the several run-ins between the Beatles and Bob Dylan during the 1960s, perhaps the most abstract involves two particular songs — one from Rubber Soul, the other from Blonde on Blonde. It’s obvious that by 1965 the Beatles had started to exhibit in their own work the absorbed influences of current American music trends, most conspicuously in George Harrison’s emulation of the Byrds and John Lennon’s reverence for Bob Dylan. The collision of both, and arguably Rubber Soul’s most Dylanesque moment, is heard on “Norwegian Wood”. Yet the subject of this post is not which Dylan number that sounds like, but rather how he reacted the following year to acknowledge the song’s similarity of spirit. Dylan did what must have seemed only natural: copied the nuts and bolts of the Beatles’ song right back at them.

His “4th Time Around” is equal parts knowing nod and humorously lazy admonition, couched in a similar melody and bar structure and stretched out about twice as long. Though “Norwegian Wood” moved the Beatles’ lyrics for the first time past straight love song and towards more whimsical terrain, its rhyme scheme is still kind of laughable on paper — likely intentionally so — and this is something that Dylan, no stranger to ridiculous rhyming himself (see: Bob Dylan’s 1st and 115th Dreams), lampoons mightily. With lines like “She buttoned her boot, straightened her suit, said ‘Don’t be cute,’” it almost seems that Dylan was sort of reaching into his past and possibly even making fun of his own former proclivities on an album that had otherwise left them more or less behind. In that way, “4th Time Around” represents an injection of tongue-in-cheek absurdity into an otherwise poignant account of a bitter misunderstanding and the amends that follow. That being said, the song overall plays it pretty straight with a lovely simplicity which, taken at face value, belies the complexity of his multi-layered homage.

Have a listen to the two:

The Beatles - "Norwegian Wood" (1965)
Bob Dylan - "4th Time Around" (1966)

It’s hard to escape the notion that John’s “Norwegian Wood” lyrics were a bit of a lark, while “4th Time Around” actually achieves some kind of real emotional resonance. For example, each song features a character who winds up on the floor, but for different reasons. John’s first person narrator gets there because he’s told “to sit anywhere, so I looked around and noticed there wasn’t a chair,” while Dylan riles his lady into screaming “till her face got so red, then she fell on the floor.”

John Lennon had different interpretations of the “response” song over the following decade, imagining that Dylan was trying to send a message to the Beatles to back off from copying his style, before ultimately deciding that the song had a more friendly tone. There are lines that make one wonder, like the downright ornery “Everybody must give something back for something they get,” and “I never asked your crutch, so don’t ask for mine.” Though for every line like that, there’s a “Felt with my thumb, gallantly handed her my very last piece of gum,” so all in all who can say.

Led Zeppelin vs. The World

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Led Zeppelin vs. The World

“If the lyric hadn’t been stolen, the music would have been lesser for it… It was decided that it was so far away in time and influence that… well, you only get caught when you’re successful. That’s the game.”

-Robert Plant

 

Editor’s Note:

This has been a hot topic for many years and Ben did an awesome job writing this up. I added some notes and the best images I could find on Google :P

Got anything to add to this list? Add it in the comments below!


Led Zeppelin is certainly no stranger to this site, which to a degree is inevitable with any highly mimicked, vastly popular band. However, most of their coverage thus far has revolved around what others have taken from the group, despite the likelihood that they themselves are one of the most infringing acts in the history of rock. A few glowing moments and an admirable knack for myth-making aside, Jimmy Page & co. borrowed far and wide for both riffs and whole songs, indebting Led Zeppelin not only to their contemporaries but even more substantially to specific old blues tunes — and yet it often went officially unacknowledged by them. Indeed, a cursory glance through old Zeppelin vinyl reveals that even tracks which were later assigned proper songwriting credits in the CD era — after the band was repeatedly taken to task — were initially devoid of any mention of their origins. Hand it to Led Zeppelin: at least they had good taste, borrowing from some of the day’s finest acts past and present.

What follows are samples of tunes that were originally notated as being solely written by the band — delusions since debunked.

Jimmy Page's "zoso" Saturn sigil

Start by considering the back-to-back examples offered in “Your Time Is Gonna Come/Black Mountain Side”, a one-two punch of plagiarism found on their 1969 debut.

The first is pretty straightforward:

Traffic - "Dear Mr. Fantasy" (1967)
Led Zeppelin - "Your Time Is Gonna Come" (1969)
Robert Plant and Steve Winwood on ThatSongSoundsLike.com

Robert Plant and Steve Winwood (Traffic)

 

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Cher Lloyd vs. Percy Montrose vs. Kelis

Friday, January 25th, 2013

Alex is on a roll this week with three stellar submissions.

Cher Lloyd on ThatSongSoundsLike.com

This one is pretty mind boggling. It looks like the American western folk ballad “Oh My Darling, Clementine” is in the public domain so it’s fair game. But who cares? Why would you use it for something like this? I normally don’t judge here but according to the “Swagger Jagger” wikipedia page it took a team of 9 writers including Cher Lloyd to produce this song and the chorus melody is directly lifted from “Oh My Darling, Clementine”. Am I missing something here??

Also note that this is the third X-Factor star to appear on this site. Others include:
Leona Lewis (vs. Avicii)
Diana Vickers (vs.  Red Hot Chili Peppers)

After listening to “Swagger Jagger” I thought of a few other things.

1. The verse sounds a lot like “Milkshake” (2003) by Kelis.

2. What’s the fascination with “Jagger”? Maroon 5′s “Moves Like Jagger” was released in 2011 as well.

3. What the hell is “swagger jagger”? I did some “research” and Urban Dictionary offered some of  the following useful information:

“A shit, pointless song with stupid lyrics made by Cher Lloyd”
“The term is infact Swagger JACKER: Someone who “Jacks” your look, style, sound etc… Taking it and passing it of as their own look/Material/ Shit, Etc…. ”
“Cher Lloyd hs produced a terrible CD using the miss interpretation “Swagger Jagger” Thus making her both a national laughing stock and an embarrassment to this country.”

So there you have it. Now you have all of the information you need to listen to the following clips:

Percy Montrose (performed by Connie Francis, 1961) - "Oh My Darling, Clementine" (1884)
Cher Lloyd - "Swagger Jagger (chorus)" (2011)
Kelis - "Milkshake" (2003)
Cher Lloyd - "Swagger Jagger (verse)" (2011)